Samuel Scheer

What is your general opinion and feeling about the Petri Dish week?

I really loved every second of it. It was engaging and exciting. What I loved most about it was the communal feeling of building something together (even though no one knew exactly what was going to be built) and the quality of the participants, they were both humble and extremely knowledgable. I enjoyed the communal cooking sessions and I wouldn’t want to miss the walks in the surrounding greens, philosophizing on AI and chicken eggs.

Did you feel you learned anything during the program? How did you develop and how might it affect your future work?

I definitely learned a few things. First, I learnt that my preferred way of taking off from my day job is not spending time on a beach reading a magazine but rather prototyping solutions for today‘s problems with brilliant minds. Secondly, I realized that great things come from small teams daring to have an impact. Our teams’ idea initially centered around one of our team members not being able to communicate anymore with her deaf grandfather. With a machine learning expert and a natural language processing professional on our team, we embarked on building functional prototypes right from the start and had a somewhat working solution in less than 24 hours. One month after, we’re planning our next physical meet up as a group. We’re only just getting started 🙂

How do you feel about the group? How meaningful were the personal connections you made during the week?

I appreciated observing cross cultural differences within the group. The Israeli participants were clearly the chefs of the kitchen while the Swedish participants brought calm and thoughtfulness to the table. I’m still in touch with all of the participants and have met some of them separately in Tel Aviv. I really felt like I made a new group of comrades in my lifelong journey.

What was the best part about Petri Dish?

As the name implies, Petri Dish was an experiment with biological components. Us participants were the bacteria that was being grown. Our ideas were the cells that split exponentially. As with any biological experiment, the outcome is never known in advance. The complexity of the underlying systems is simply too high. Similarly, none of us knew what would come out of Petri Dish. From today‘s point of view, I can say it was deeply enjoyable while it lasted and it’s not over just yet. Kudos to Adam for pulling off such a feat!

Caroline Dahl

What is your general opinion and feeling about the Petri Dish week?

Petri Dish was fantastic and very intellectually stimulating.

Did you feel you learned anything during the program? How did you develop and how might it affect your future work?

That founding a startup idea personal passions is paramount to its survival. That exploring such passions is possible in an environment where there is trust. That trust can be built in such short time, using the right means.

How do you feel about the group? How meaningful were the personal connections you made during the week?

The group was very nice. This was important for dynamics. I am still in touch with my team mates, while other connections have withered.

What was the best part about Petri Dish?

Getting to know Israeli culture, and making friends/partners for present and future ventures.

Shani Shalgi

The best part of Petri Dish was meeting new, amazing, interesting people who I’d otherwise not have met. Apart from the social aspect, which was great, it was a chance to connect and learn from people who are not in your normal crowd and get their insight on a range of topics. I also loved the secluded mansion setting, the food and the location.

After the project is over, I’m planning on continuing to develop the blog post I wrote about my idea during the project, and especially send it out to most members of the group to hear their input. One member of the group agreed to co-edit the post with me, so I’m looking forward to working on that together.

I learnt about the difference between an idea and an idea for a startup, I learnt that people with mutual interests aren’t necessarily the best group partners, but rather you need to find the people who you are also able to work with. I learnt how to focus an initial idea and about the ideation process, which was very interesting. I also learnt that even if a topic is extremely interesting, it does not necessarily translate into a great idea.

The Petri Dish project might affect my work in the future when I have to decide on following up on a new idea or during future ideation sessions. I will also stay in touch with some of the members and would like to hear about their upcoming projects.